What do you get for your 63,916 At Wellesley

Obviously not an education on how to write well and develop arguments.

This showed up on Ace of Spades.

http://ace.mu.nu/archives/369303.php

Never mind the content, which is pretty bad.

https://heatst.com/culture-wars/student-newspaper-of-hillary-clintons-alma-mater-openly-threatens-those-who-refuse-to-adapt-their-beliefs/

University students calling for intolerance and suppression of speech is not a good thing.  One would think though, that students attending a University that charges well over the typical average income of a household, a well known elite school, the classic Ivy Covered Snob Factory would at least be able to express themselves well and be well written. Unfortunately if this is any example, that appears not to be the case. Lets see if I can improve the drek

http://web.archive.org/web/20170414124916/http://thewellesleynews.com/2017/04/12/free-speech-is-not-violated-at-Wellesley/

any members of our community, including students, alumnae and faculty, have criticized the Wellesley community for becoming an environment where free speech is not allowed or is a violated right. Many outside sources have painted us as a bunch of hot house flowers who cannot exist in the real world.> (this is where the paragraph should end.  )  However, we fundamentally disagree with that characterization, and we disagree with the idea that free speech is infringed upon at Wellesley. Rather, our Wellesley community will not stand for hate speech, and will call it out when possible.

Wellesley students are generally correct in their attempts to differentiate what is viable discourse  from (“just” here)  what is <just>(delete) hate speech. Wellesley is certainly not a place for racism, sexism, homophobia, Islamophobia, transphobia or any other type of discriminatory speech. Shutting down rhetoric that undermines the existence and rights of others is not a violation of free speech; it is hate speech. (this sentence destroys their argument, needs rewriting) The founding fathers put free speech in the Constitution as a way to protect the disenfranchised and to protect individual citizens from the power of the government.(they need to study their history) The spirit of free speech is to protect the suppressed, not to protect a free-for-all where anything is acceptable, no matter how hateful and damaging.(again they don’t seem to understand their argument)

This being said, the tone surrounding the current discourse is becoming increasingly hostile. Wellesley College is an institution whose aim is to educate. Students who come to Wellesley hail from a variety of diverse backgrounds. With this diversity comes previously-held biases that are in part the products of home environments. Wellesley forces us to both recognize and grow from these beliefs, as is the mark of a good college education. However, as students, it is important to recognize that this process does not occur without bumps along the way. It is inevitable that there will be moments in this growth process where mistakes will happen and controversial statements will be said. However, we argue that these questionable claims should be mitigated by education as opposed to personal attacks.(paragraph starts on one topic and then launches into another. Should discuss hostile environment and then in new paragraph, diversity)

We have all said problematic claims, the origins of which were ingrained in us by our discriminatory and biased society. Luckily, most of us have been taught by our peers and mentors at Wellesley in a productive way. It is vital that we encourage people to correct and learn from their mistakes rather than berate them for a lack of education they could not control.  While it is expected that these lessons will be difficult and often personal, holding difficult conversations for the sake of educating is very different from shaming on the basis of ignorance.(same thing as above. First sentence adds nothing to paragraph and should just be deleted. )

This being said, if people are given the resources to learn and either continue to speak hate speech or refuse to adapt their beliefs, then hostility may be warranted. If people continue to support racist politicians or pay for speakers that prop up speech that will lead to the harm of others, then it is critical to take the appropriate measures to hold them accountable for their actions. It is important to note that our preference for education over beration regards students who may have not been given the chance to learn. Rather, we are not referring to those who have already had the incentive to learn and should have taken the opportunities to do so. Paid professional lecturers and politicians are among those who should know better.(Paragraph destroys their argument that free speech is present at Wellesley. You can’t have speech suppression and free speech simultaneously.)

We at The Wellesley News, are not interested in any type of tone policing. The emotional labor required to educate people is immense and is additional weight that is put on those who are already forced to defend their human rights. There is no denying that problematic opinions need to be addressed in order to stop Wellesley from becoming a place where hate speech and casual discrimination is okay. However, as a community we need to make an effort to have this dialogue in a constructive and educational way in order to build our community up. Talk-back, protest videos and personal correspondences are also ways to have a constructive dialogue. Let us first bridge the gap between students in our community before we resort to personal attacks. Our student body is not only smart, it is also kind. Let us demonstrate that through productive dialogue.

Never mind the fact that productive dialogue is exactly what these student, their mentors and instructors do not want.  That’s a given. There’s no room for argument for these people and “education” only goes from them to you. This is the expression of totalitarianism in the same way that is an old familiar face, with the boot that stamps in the face, forever.

One would expect though that people that spent their entire lives working to get into a school that they will be paying upwards of $250,000 for and requires a high score on their SAT’s to get in would be able to understand and develop some semblance of a coherent argument for even this ugly sow’s ear.  The fact that they can’t should demonstrate just how ugly this is.  Free speech doesn’t care how offended somebody else is.  Free speech doesn’t guarantee that you may never hear things that offend you or speech that you might hate. Free speech means that people should have the right to speak truths that people may not want to hear.  Apparently they have a problem with that at Wellesley.

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