Ask The Man Who Owns One

Last year I bought an old library book at a book sale full of Packard ads from the early days through the end of World War 2.  Packard is long gone now, remains in our memories.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Packard

Scan-4

Here are the images.

1912

Image1-11

Emphasizing the modern features in Packard cars.  And that a woman can drive it by herself.

1919

Image2-2

A fantasy lifestyle in your Packard car.  Comforting to their wealthy owners.

1928

Image3

Packard builds cars with skill and craftsmanship

1930

Image1-12

Packard, the party car

1933

Image2-3

Packard, ask the man who’s had his car for years.

1935

Image3-1

Packard owners are the elite.  This is an obvious appeal to the “keeping up with the Jones'” for the wealthy set. That changed for Packard as the 1930’s progressed and the company went down market

1939

Image4-1

Convincing potential customer that a Packard wasn’t out of the question anymore.

1940

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Bob got the sale and presumably a new Packard from the commissions.

1943

Image6

Keep your car up at the Packard dealer and beat Hitler.  Appeals to patriotism were big in the war.

After the war Packard was consolidated with a bunch of other car makers and then closed. Here’s some Packard videos.

How Packard builds  a body out of wood:
Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:

How Packard prove a Packard

Part 1:

Part 2:

A History Channel Packard Documentary:

Jay Leno:

Just a little automobile history.

 

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2 comments

  1. Pingback: 2,000 Posts | The Arts Mechanical
  2. jccarlton · December 30

    Reblogged this on The Arts Mechanical and commented:

    Another post that need love. Packard was once the primo car company in the US. Their catchphrase was: “ask the man who owns one” They mostly sold to the wealthy and when the Depression and WW2 hit the company never really recovered it’s markets and could not diversify to meet the needs of the 1950’s.

    Like

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